Here are the most recent posts from Science Woke.

by Eric Reiter (October 13, 2019)
A recent experimental paper in Nature tries to show that large molecule-sized particles diffract like waves. Here is why I think not, and how this popularization falls short. I expect this to be difficult material for most of my friends, but I post here for the record. awaken
by Harry Ricker (October 7, 2019)
This essay discusses the background for the Wakefield Experiments. This refers to two sets of experiments performed by Tony Wakefield an Australian amateur radio operator, or ham, who performed these experiments for Ivor Catt. The objective of these experiments was to verify the predictions made by Ivor Catt based upon his Theory C. This theory asserts several things. First, that a capacitor is a transmission line, and second, that there is no static charge in a capacitor, but that the stored energy consists of a reciprocating wave of energy that surges back and forth in a continuous cycle. The objective of the Wakefield experiments was to demonstrate this internal motion of electromagnetic waves inside a charged transmission line. awaken
by Nick Percival (September 27, 2019)
While this article is in the Special Relativity section of ScienceWoke, it addresses a fundamental issue with much of physics. However, since it’s related to my other articles here (Parts 1 to 5), and it addresses a key flaw in relativity’s “spacetime” model, I’ve placed it in this section. awaken
by Harry Ricker (September 19, 2019)
This discussion is about the encounter of a genius, Dr Carl Andrew Zapffe, with relativity physics. There are two main points. The first is that Dr Zapffe was not a fool or an ignorant person, he was trained scientist who, when he investigated the arcane details of relativity, discovered that Einstein had made a mistake. Being a conscientious person he felt obligated to bring this to the attention of the scientific community. Our story is about how his views were received. How one famous author of relativity books concluded that he was a “cod“, and how NASA rejected his idea to perform a crucial experiment that would determine once and for all the validity of the foundations of relativity. awaken
by Harry Ricker (September 13, 2019)
Historians condense the facts to make complex social movements simple and understandable in hindsight. Our movement to reform establishment science, making it responsible to the needs of people who fund science with their taxes, and not a servant of the established state system, traces its origin to the work of Dr. John E. Chappell Jr., who organized the predecessor of the JCNPS known as the Natural Philosophy Alliance or NPA. awaken
by Harry Ricker (August 28, 2019)
The purpose of this article is to publish and comment upon a letter written by Louis Essen and sent to Dr. Carl Zapffe. The letter is interesting because it compresses into a few short lines the essence of Louis Essen’s criticism of Einstein’s theory of relativity. awaken
by Harry Ricker (August 21, 2019)
In his book Science and Hypothesis, first published in French in 1902, Poincare gives to the principle of relativity the status of a unifying principle in both mathematics and physics. It is an important theme of the book, which unifies this collection of essays. At the end of the book, Poincare discusses how this principle is rendered safe in Lorentz’s theory of electro-dynamics. It is certain that Einstein drank deeply from the waters of Poincare’s book and fully embraced the ideas contained in Poincare’s Principle Of Relativity. awaken
by Toshiyasu Abe (August 15, 2019)
While I was working there, I sometimes had to go down to the basement and peel potatoes alone, in a dark, cold, and wet room. At first, I didn’t like this dungeon-like place, especially when it was icy cold and snowing outside. But I found that because my task was easy, and there was no one around to bother me, I could spend lots of time thinking about physics, while peeling those potatoes. At the time, I was reading a book about Einstein’s Relativity Theory. awaken
by Stephen Hurrell (August 12, 2019)
The press love stories about dinosaurs, especially if it includes everyone’s favourite dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex (T. rex), so it’s no surprise that a new science study in 2017 was well publicised. The study shows a T. rex’s running ability was limited by the strength of its leg bones. It couldn’t run in our gravity. awaken
by Glenn Borchardt (August 11, 2019)
Thomas Kuhn generally is a hero among dissidents. Along with his explication of what it all meant, his invention of the word “paradigm” was his greatest achievement. A paradigm forms the body of data, assumptions, and interpretations guiding a discipline during a particular period. A paradigm cannot be overthrown by anyone whose livelihood depends on it—only outsiders need apply for that infrequent function. awaken
by Harry Ricker (July 29, 2019)
This paper defines a new way to assess the scientific value of Einstein’s special theory of relativity by defining a concept called irksomeness. This follows by converting the adjective irksome, meaning vexatious or troublesome, into a noun. We will call a theory irksome by the following definition: An irksome theory is one in which each of its component demonstrations makes sense or is rational, but the theory as a whole makes no sense or is irrational. Hence a theory, such as relativity, which is a very good example of a theory possessing this characteristic, is irksome or possesses irksomeness, if it satisfies the above definition. An irksome theory is recalcitrant in that its inconsistencies, anomalies, or paradoxes refuse to be tamed or effectively eliminated. It is also irksome when its concepts can not be clearly defined in a way such that there is a consistent agreement regarding its essential truth claims. awaken
by Stephen Hurrell (July 20, 2019)
The Lifetime Achievement Award (2017) was bestowed on Maxlow for his work in geology, principally in developing Expansion Tectonics, including the generation of expansion models, in his lifetime pursuit of scientific truth. awaken
by Cynthia Whitney (July 17, 2019)
Now the fact is this: The Sagnac effect is fatal to SRT as presently practiced. Draper people already knew that, and I soon knew it too. And that is how I became a Dissident Physicist. awaken
by David de Hilster (July 5, 2019)
It is probably the most sought after prize in physics. Einstein wanted it, everyone talks about it, and dissidents claim to have solved it. What is it? The unification of the four forces in nature. The latest in this quest for the "grand unification" has been quantum gravity or the unified field theory where physicists are trying to unify Einstein's general relativity with the strong force inside the atom. So far, there has been little success with many candidate theories not passing the grade and having been debunked by the experiments during the last 10 years of the Large Hadron Collider. awaken
by James Grist (July 4, 2019)
Its been in the news as imminent for years, but it actually took until May 2019 for the the International Committee for Weights and Measures to officially change the definition of the kilogram from an artefact kilogram ( a lump of metal in Paris ) to a multiple of units based on fundamental constants. awaken
by David de Hilster (July 3, 2019)
With a number of sunny days, the conference was held in Alder Hall on the beautiful campus of the Unversity of Washington with majestic buildings, amazingly large trees, and beautiful vistas of the mountain including a picture-perfect view of Mount Reneir. awaken
by Harry Ricker (July 3, 2019)
The following letter was prepared by Harry Ricker as a courtesy to Ivor Catt who wished to send a letter to the editor of the IOP Journal Physics Education in order to refute the claims made in a paper published in that journal. The letter was cosigned by five other scientists. This letter was rejected and so it is presented here. Background for The Catt Question is presented by Ivor Catt at his website. awaken
by Harry Ricker (May 31, 2019)
The search for the elusive dark matter is famous. Here I will discuss the discovery of a different kind of dark matter in interstellar space, which I call cobwebs of space. This dark matter is just as elusive as the more famous, but probably fictitious, dark matter. The appearance of this dark matter, which forms dark filaments in space is referred to herein as interstellar dust filaments. This is because they are like the dark clouds that populate interstellar space, but they are long and narrow and crisscross throughout space forming the appearance of a dark cobweb that overlies all of the space through which we view distant celestial objects. awaken
by David de Hilster (May 25, 2019)
Light just may be the most important phenomena in the universe to life. It transmits information about the physical world around us and has fascinated we humans for thousands of years. But the biggest question about light still remains: what is it really? Mainstream science tells us that it is photon. Yet if you look at conventional descriptions, one quickly learns that the definition seems still very unclear. awaken
by Harry Ricker (May 17, 2019)
This report documents a study of Milky Way dust filaments that appear in photographs of external galaxies. The technique used in this investigation is the use of software photograph processing tools called effects filters. The software used here is the On One Photo Perfect Effects 9. This allows the adjustment of digital photos to enhance aspects of the photo to permit the investigation of foreground dust in galaxy photographs. The thesis of this study is that the classification and interpretation of galaxy photographs is significantly influenced by foreground dust filaments that appear in projection against the bright background of external galaxies. awaken